Cross The Streams podcast #5 online

The title says it all – Cross the Streams is up to episode #5 and is bringing in special guest, Ben “Kingpin” Kingsley, GB mod extraordinaire;

Cross The Streams Radio Show – Lucky #5

On the latest installment of Cross the Streams Radio Show, we deal with the latest rumors and truths to the film that may or may not be in pre-production, Ghostbusters 3. We sit down and talk to GB.org and GBfans.com Moderator Ben King along side with Ghostheads Podcast co-host Jason Hughes.

We hope you all enjoy Cross the Streams Radio Show and will continue to listen to future broadcasts…who knows who will be on next.

Cross the Streams Radio Show - Lucky #5

Episode 5 Contains the Following:

Show’s Intro
Monologue
Commercial
Round Table with guests Ben King and Jason Hughes
Commercial
Show’s Extro

If you have any questions, comments or just feedback that you’d like to give about Episode 5, or about the show in general, please feel free to email us at:

crossthestreams@live.com

The shirt that never will be.

Grim sent in this link to a Threadless design that, guessing from the relatively low score, will not get made into a shirt. But, it’s still a great shirt – I would have bought one. Maybe it will get its chance in the future, but for how, it’s just another example of how this is the silver age of Ghostbusters fandom.

New Mexico GBs! Midnight screenings tonight and tomorrow!

A bit last minute, but the Guild Cinema — 3405 Central Ave NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 – in Nob Hill (snicker) is having midnight screenings of Ghostbusters tonight (Friday) and tomorrow. From the Alibi, who are sponsoring the event;

Alibi is sponsoring another Midnight Movie Madness screening this Friday and Saturday night at the Guild Cinema in Nob Hill. We’re returning, as we often like to do, to the glorious 1980s. Our film this weekend is the supernatural comedy classic Ghostbusters. Come on by and quote along to all your favorite lines. The film screens at 10 p.m. and midnight on Jan. 29 and 30. As always, there will be cool doorprize giveaways!

Gathering fans to have fun and shout out quotes at a midnight movie? I wonder why nobody suggested that before?

Column: The Private Sector – Where Has All the Pyrotechnic Fluid Gone?

Sure it’s crowded, it’s dirty, and there’s people here that would just assume step on your face than look at you, but one of the benefits of living in Los Angeles is the incredible wealth of talent, especially when it comes to “movie magic,” that calls such a place like Los Angeles home. This past Saturday, some of the greatest talents in the visual effects business gathered for the Visual Effects Society’s “25th (and 1/2) Anniversary” Screening of Ghostbusters at the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.

The event, which was touted as a screening and Q&A session with “special guests” turned into an impromptu reunion of the Boss Films crew, the former Marina Del Rey folks behind the visual effects of Ghostbusters, 2010, and their final project Alien 3. It goes without saying that the event was memorable – from stories of the complicated process in which the Stay Puft costume was engulfed in flame (“We… uh… put gasoline on him… and lit him up.”) to the wealth of fantastic archival photos by Virgil Mirano, which were expertly (and far too quickly) piloted by fellow DVD producer and visual effects magician Van Ling.

But what I really took away from the reunion/screening was just how fun the process of making movies used to be.

It’s funny seeing the twinkle in Richard Edlund’s eye when he reflects upon his time spent building Boss Studios from the ground up specifically for Ghostbusters and 2010, especially considering that Edlund is one of the greatest proponents of a digital, non-photo chemical, visual effects age. You get the feeling that he, and all of the participants that were on stage at the event, loved the challenge that having to produce everything optically presented. And when you stop and think about it, why wouldn’t they? If given the choice between being on a soundstage and rigging a solid-steel model of a Central Park West apartment building with explosives – then blowing the thing to kingdom come… or sitting and having a team of twelve animators at ILM digitally create the explosion frame by frame, I think the former is quite a bit more exciting than the latter.

There was one point in the moderated panel where the crew was discussing the challenge of animating the “rubberized light” beams that emit from the Ghostbusters particle accelerators. The solution, as described, was that the weapon was actually sucking atoms and particles from the area in which it was pointed so the pyrotechnics that were assembled on-set were made to look more like something “pulling” from the sets and less like the impact of an explosion (and, if you frame-by-frame through the DVD, you’ll notice the actual animated streams actually start on the wall and THEN link back to the proton gun three frames later). Fascinating and fun anecdotes that I had never known, and each person on the panel spoke of the process with a childlike glee.

But even taking that “fun aspect” out of it, one could argue that better and more effective work was produced when there was a challenge presented to the filmmakers. Can you imagine Steven Spielberg’s Jaws if the mechanical shark was computer generated and didn’t present any problems? How about Ridley Scott’s Alien film if he wasn’t hiding the man in a suit in the dark shadows of the Nostromo? I’ve vented at great lengths elsewhere (and frequently) about how computer generated effects have freed up (but become a handicap for) visionary filmmakers, so I won’t venture into that territory again. But I think that the point is clear: they just don’t make ‘em like they used to.

That much was abundantly clear in seeing and hearing the former wizards of Boss Films wax nostalgic on their Ghostbusters work. It was challenging, it was stressful, the pressure was insurmountable, and the fate of both their studio and others hung in the balance… yet twenty-five odd years later they are all still able to come together and the result is akin to a family reunion. Because despite all that hardship, they still had a helluva time.

Here’s hoping that the folks already hard at work on a third installment of this famed franchise take into account the challenge, and don’t take any of the shortcuts available in this modern era of filmmaking for granted… well… okay… and that they have a helluva time doing so.

(The Private Sector is a weekly syndicated column written by Troy Benjamin presented every Wednesday on GB Fans, Proton Charging, and Ghostbusters.net as an op-ed look at the goings on in the world of the Ghostbusters franchise. Learn more about Troy at www.troybenjamin.com)

Universal Studios Florida Ecto-1 auctioned off one year after last sale!


Jeff from the Arizona Ghostbusters pointed out that there’s a lot of buzz at GBFans.com about the Ecto-1 replica that used to feature at Universal Studios Orlando, was auctioned off in Scottsdale recently. A lot of pictures were taken and the car was even featured on the Speed Network, where it sold for $80,000 (88K with a 10% buyer commission added – woof)! That’s nearly double what it sold for less that one year ago, you’ll recall.

Ernie Hudson was on hand for the auction, which was a nice surprise, but I’m a little unsure about the announcer’s patter, which I think is a misunderstanding and combination of facts. When the car went on sale last year (same car with the same title of ownership from USF) it was firmly believed by Ecto fans that this car was not created for the film, but after the film for specific use by USF. This then would, as I understand it, make it the post-filming promotional car, built by Peter Mosen, and then (again, from the chatter around last year’s sale) later refurbished and made more movie accurate by Steve Johnson pal, Paul Francis.

Summary: Sony authorized 1 of 3 original cars. Comes with a copy of the Universal title and bill of sale. Street legal, own a piece of car history.
Details: This is one of the 3 original authorized Ghostbuster cars by Sony. This car comes with a copy of the original Universal Studio title and bill of sale. This is an autographed car. This car is street legal, the lights and sirens all work. This is your chance to own a piece of automobile history. This car draws a huge crowd where ever it goes. Remember there are only 3 in the world and this is 1 of them. What more can be said about this Ghostbusters car that you don’t already know.